Childcare Worker

After School Coordinator, After School Counselor, Assistant Teacher, Attendant, Au Pair, Baby Attendant   More Names
Babysitter, Before and After School Daycare Worker, Boarding Mother, Bus Escort, Bus Matron, Caregiver, Child Attendant, Child Care Aide, Child Care Assistant, Child Care Attendant, Child Care Development Specialist, Child Care Provider, Child Care Sitter, Child Care Supervisor, Child Care Teacher, Child Care Worker, Child Caregiver, Child Daycare Worker, Child Life Specialist, Child Monitor, Child's Nurse, Childcare Aide, Childcare Attendant, Childcare Provider, Childcare Worker, Children's Aide, Children's Attendant, Children's Institution Attendant, Children's Lunchroom Supervisor, Classroom Monitor, Day Care Aide, Day Care Assistant, Day Care Attendant, Day Care Home Mother, Day Care Home Provider, Day Care Supervisor, Daycare Assistant, Daycare Provider, Daycare Teacher, Daycare Worker, Family Day Care Provider, Governess, Hall Monitor, Home Child Care Provider, Infant and Toddler Teacher, Infant Childcare Provider, Infant Room Teacher, Infant Teacher, Lunchroom Aide, Lunchroom Attendant, Lunchroom Monitor, Lunchroom Mother, Mother Helper, Mother's Helper, Nanny, Nursemaid, Nursery Attendant, Nursery Helper, Nursery School Attendant, Nursery Supervisor, Parent Aide, Playground Attendant, Playground Monitor, Playground Supervisor, Playroom Attendant, School Bus Aide, School Bus Attendant, School Bus Monitor, School Childcare Attendant, Sitter, Toddler Caregiver, Toddler Teacher
Most Common Education Levels

** This graph is based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data and offers a snapshot (based on a statistical sample) of the actual education and training levels of those persons who are currently working in this career. It does not necessarily reflect the education or training that an employer may require of a new hire. **

Current Entry Requirements
Childcare workers must meet education and training requirements, which vary with state regulations. Some states require these workers to have a high school diploma, but many states do not have any education requirements. However, employers often prefer to hire workers with at least a high school diploma and, in some cases, some postsecondary education in early childhood education. Beginning in 2013, workers in Head Start programs must at least be enrolled in a program in which they will earn an associate's degree in early childhood education or a child development credential. Many states require providers to complete some training before beginning work. Often, these requirements can be satisfied by having some college credits or by earning a degree in early childhood education. States do not regulate educational requirements for nannies and babysitters. However, some employers may prefer to hire workers with at least some formal instruction in education or a related field, particularly when they will be hired as full-time nannies.

 
     

Career Snapshot

Typical Education:

High School or GED (HS)
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Percent Job Growth:

6% - Slower than average
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Typical Wages:

Annual: $18,680 - $25,490

Hourly: $9 - $12