Receptionists and Information Clerks

Appointment Clerk, Appointment Scheduler, Appointment Setter, Automobile Club Information Clerk   More Names
Call Center Agent, Call Center Operator, Call Center Representative, Call Taker, Clerk Specialist, Clinic Receptionist, Community Liaison, Credit Reporting Clerk, Customer Care Representative (CCR), Dental Receptionist, Emergency Room Clerk, Front Desk Clerk, Front Desk Officer, Front Desk Receptionist, Greeter, Guard Entrance Registrar, Hospital Receptionist, Hospitality Aide, In-File Operator, Information Assistant, Information Specialist, Land Leasing Examiner, Land Leasing Information Clerk, Legal Receptionist, Medical Office Receptionist, Medical Receptionist, Medical Scheduler, Member Service Representative, Merchandising Assistant, Office Assistant, Outpatient Clerk, Park Aide, Patient Registration Representative, Pay Station Attendant, People Greeter, Policyholder Information Clerk, Quoter, Receptionist, Receptionist Telephone Operator, Referral and Information Aide, Referral Coordinator, Register Clerk, Registrar, Registration Clerk, Research Clerk, Schedule Announcer, Scheduler, Senior Receptionist, Space Scheduler, Telephone Answerer, Telephone Appointment Clerk, Telephone Clerk, Telephone Information Clerk, Telephone Operator Receptionist, Telephone Quotation Clerk, Tourist Information Assistant, Unit Assistant, Utility Clerk
Most Common Education Levels

** This graph is based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data and offers a snapshot (based on a statistical sample) of the actual education and training levels of those persons who are currently working in this career. It does not necessarily reflect the education or training that an employer may require of a new hire. **

Current Entry Requirements
Receptionists generally need a high school diploma or its equivalent. Most receptionists receive their training on the job. They learn how to operate the telephone system and computers and learn the proper procedures for greeting visitors. While many of these skills can be learned quickly, those who give information to the public or customers may need several weeks to learn details about the organization. Employers often look for applicants who know spreadsheets, word processing software, or other industry specific software applications. Some employers may prefer applicants who have some formal office education or training.

 
      

Career Snapshot

Typical Education:

High School or GED (HS)
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Percent Job Growth:

10% - Average
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Typical Wages:

Annual: $22,700 - $34,280

Hourly: $11 - $16