Construction Manager

Brickmason Contractor, Bridges and Buildings Supervisor, Building Construction Contractor   More Names
Cement Contractor, Commercial Construction Superintendent, Concrete Foreman, Construction Area Manager, Construction Consultant, Construction Contractor, Construction Coordinator, Construction Director, Construction Foreman, Construction Manager, Construction Project Manager, Construction Superintendent, Construction Trades Contractor, Constructor, Contractor, Developer, Drilling and Production Superintendent, Drywall Contractor, Electrical Contractor, Energy Efficient Site Manager, Environmental Construction Engineer, Environmental Construction Program Manager, Excavating Contractor, General Contractor, General Superintendent, Home Improvement Contractor, House Wrecker, Job Superintendent, Land Developer, Landscape Contractor, Maintenance of Way Superintendent, Masonry Contractor, Masonry Contractor Administrator, Mine Superintendent, Mine Supervisor, Painting Contractor, Paperhanger Contractor, Paving Contractor, Plastering Contractor, Plumbing and Heating Contractor, Plumbing Contractor, Project Executive, Project Manager, Project Specialist, Project Superintendent, Property Developer, Railroad Construction Director, Road Contractor, Roofing Contractor, Senior Site Manager, Sewer Contractor, Sheet Metal Contractor, Site Manager, Site Supervising Technical Operator, Solar Commercial Installation Electrician Manager, Street Contractor, Street Supervisor, Superintendent, Utility Division Project Manager, Vice President of Operations, Weatherization Operations Manager, Wrecker
Description

Construction managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from early development to completion. Construction managers typically do the following: Prepare and negotiate cost estimates, budgets, and work timetables; select appropriate construction methods and strategies Interpret and explain contracts and technical information to workers and other professionals.

Report on work progress and budget matters to clients; collaborate with architects, engineers, and other construction and building specialists Instruct and supervise construction personnel and activities onsite; respond to work delays and other problems and emergencies; select, hire, and instruct laborers and subcontractors; comply with legal requirements, building and safety codes, and other regulations.

Construction managers, often called general contractors or project managers, coordinate and supervise a wide variety of projects, including the building of all types of residential, commercial, and industrial structures, roads, bridges, power plants, schools, and hospitals. They oversee specialized contractors and other personnel.

Construction managers schedule and coordinate all design and construction processes to ensure a productive and safe work environment. They also make sure jobs are completed on time and on budget with the right amount of tools, equipment, and materials. Many managers also are responsible for obtaining necessary permits and licenses. They are often responsible for multiple projects at a time.

Construction managers work closely with other building specialists, such as architects, engineers, and a variety of trade workers, such as stonemasons, electricians, and carpenters. Projects may require specialists in everything from structural metalworking and painting, to landscaping, building roads, installing carpets, and excavating sites. Depending on the project, construction managers also may interact with lawyers and local government officials.

For example, when working on city-owned property or municipal buildings, managers sometimes confer with city council members to ensure that all regulations are met. For projects too large to be managed by one person, such as office buildings and industrial complexes, a construction manager would only be in charge of one part of the project.

Each construction manager would oversee a specific construction phase and choose subcontractors to complete it. Construction managers may need to collaborate and coordinate with other construction managers who are responsible for different aspects of the project.

To maximize efficiency and productivity, construction managers often use specialized cost-estimating and planning software to effectively budget the time and money required to complete specific projects. Many managers also use software to determine the best way to get materials to the building site. For more information, see the profile on cost estimators.

As buildings become more energy efficient, the construction manager will need to possess the following skills:

Apply green building strategies to reduce energy costs or minimize carbon output or other sources of harm to the environment; develop construction budgets that compare green and non-green construction alternatives in terms of short-term costs, long-term costs, or environmental impacts; develop or implement environmental protection programs; implement training programs on environmentally responsible building topics to update employee skills and knowledge; i inspect or review projects to monitor compliance with environmental regulations; perform or contract others to perform prebuilding assessments, such as conceptual cost estimating, rough order of magnitude estimating, feasibility, or energy efficiency, environmental, and sustainability assessments; procure Leadership in Energy Efficient Design (LEED) or other environmentally certified professionals to ensure responsible design and building activities or to achieve favorable LEED ratings for building projects.

More Details
Job Growth and Wages
Percent Job Growth:  
5% - Slower than average
Typical Wages (National):  
Annual: $68,050 - $119,710    Hourly: $33 - $58
Physical/Medical/Health Requirements

No specifc requirement is identified at this time.

Legal Requirements
General/Nationwide
State-Specific
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(Data Drawn from O*NET)
 
      

Career Snapshot

Typical Education:

Bachelor's Degree (High School + 4 or more Years)
Find Programs

Percent Job Growth:

5% - Slower than average
Find Jobs

Typical Wages:

Annual: $68,050 - $119,710

Hourly: $33 - $58