Electrical and Electronics Repairer, Powerhouse, Substation, and Relay

Apparatus Lineman, Corrosion Control Fitter, Corrosion Technician   More Names
Electrical and Instrumentation Technician (E & I Technician), Electrical Maintenance Mechanic, Electrical Technician, Gear Technician, Generating Station Mechanic, Generator Mechanic, Instrument and Control Technician (I & C Technician), Instrumentation and Control Technician (I&C Technician), Instrumentation Fitter, Lineman, Maintenance Technician, Meter/Relay Craftsman, Meter/Relay Technician, Motor Room Controller, Power Transformer Repairer, Powerhouse Electrician, Powerhouse Mechanic, Relay Engineer, Relay Operator, Relay Technician, Substation Electrician, Substation Mechanic, Substation Technician, Substation Wireman, Test Technician, Transformer Repairer, Wireman
Description

Electrical and electronics installers and repairers install, repair, or replace a variety of electrical equipment in telecommunications, transportation, utilities, and other industries. Electrical and electronics installers and repairers typically do the following: Prepare cost estimates for clients; refer to service guides, schematics, and manufacturer specifications.

Repair or replace defective parts, such as motors, fuses, or gaskets; reassemble and test equipment after repairs; maintain records of parts used, labor time, and final charges. Electrical and electronics installers and repairers work on complex pieces of electronic equipment. Automated electronic control systems are becoming increasingly complex. As a result, repairers use software programs and testing equipment to diagnose malfunctions. Among their diagnostic tools are multimeters-which measure voltage, current, and resistance-and advanced multimeters, which measure the capacitance, inductance, and current gain of transistors. Repairers also use signal generators, which provide test signals, and oscilloscopes, which display signals graphically.

In addition, repairers use hand tools such as pliers, screwdrivers, soldering irons, and wrenches to replace faulty parts and adjust equipment. Commercial and industrial equipment electrical and electronics repairers repair, test, adjust, or install electronic equipment, such as industrial controls, transmitters, and antennas.

Electrical and electronics installers and repairers of transportation equipment install, adjust, or maintain mobile communication equipment, including sound, sonar, security, navigation, and surveillance systems on trains, watercraft, or other vehicles. Powerhouse, substation, and relay electrical and electronics repairers inspect, test, maintain, or repair electrical equipment used in generating stations, substations, and inservice relays.

These workers may be known as powerhouse electricians, relay technicians, or power transformer repairers. Electric motor, power tool, and related repairers-such as armature winders, generator mechanics, and electric golf cart repairers-specialize in installing, maintaining, and repairing electric motors, wiring, or switches.

Electronic equipment installers and repairers of motor vehicles install, diagnose, and repair sound, security, and navigation equipment in motor vehicles. Motor vehicle installers and repairers work with an increasingly complex range of electronic equipment, including DVD players, navigation systems, and passive and active security systems.

Electrical and electronic installers and repairers may specialize, according to how and where they work: Field technicians often travel to factories or other locations to repair equipment. When equipment breaks down, field technicians go to a customer's site to repair the equipment. Because repairing components is a complex activity, workers on the factory floor usually remove and replace defective units, such as circuit boards, instead of fixing them.

Defective units are discarded or returned to the manufacturer or a specialized shop for repair. Bench technicians work in repair shops in factories and service centers, fixing components that cannot be repaired on the factory floor. These workers also locate and repair circuit defects, such as poorly soldered joints, blown fuses, or malfunctioning transistors.

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Job Growth and Wages
Percent Job Growth:  
-5% - Decline slowly or moderately
Typical Wages (National):  
Annual: $64,800 - $87,220    Hourly: $31 - $42
Physical/Medical/Health Requirements

Color vision. Workers need to identify the color-coded components that are often used in electronic equipment.

Color vision. Workers need to identify the color-coded components that are often used in electronic equipment.

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Legal Requirements
General/Nationwide
State-Specific
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(Data Drawn from O*NET)
 
      

Career Snapshot

Typical Education:

Certificate (High School + 0-4 years, Certificate awarded)
Find Programs

Percent Job Growth:

-5% - Decline slowly or moderately
Find Jobs

Typical Wages:

Annual: $64,800 - $87,220

Hourly: $31 - $42